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The Traditional Owners of this land are those who identify as
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples.

Sovereignty was never ceded.

ANTAR pays respect to Elders past, present, and emerging through our dedicated advocacy for First Nations Peoples’ justice and rights.

ANTAR acknowledges the responsibility of committing to a truth-telling process that promotes an honest and respectful path forward for future generations to build upon.

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Stories for Simon

A beautiful story of acknowledging the past and working together for a brighter future.

When Simon unwraps a beautiful boomerang wrapped in an old newspaper, he learns of the national apology to the Stolen Generations. Who were the Stolen Generations and how can saying ‘sorry’ help? Through a new friendship and a magnificent collection of stories, Simon gains a deep appreciation of the past and a positive vision for the future.

Author: Lisa Miranda Sarzin, Lauren Briggs (Illustrator)

Pages: 32

Published: 6-8

My Story, Ngaginybe Jarragbe

My mother shows me how to get bushtucker and she shows me how to paint. Now I’m a famous artist. My paintings are all over the world hanging in important places. Happy times.

Told in English and Gija, this is the story of Shirley Purdie, famous Gija artist, as told through her paintings, as part of the Ngaalim-Ngalimboorro Ngagenybe exhibition created for the 2018 National Portrait Gallery exhibition So Fine: Contemporary women artists make Australian history.

Author: Shirley Purdie

Pages: 32

Published: 0-9

Mad Magpie

Mad Magpie tells the story of Guluu, an angry magpie who is being teased by a gang of butcher birds.

The more he is teased, the angrier he becomes. When Guluu seeks advice, his Elders tell him to stay calm like the river, ignore the butcher birds and to be strong on the inside. Guluu tries this, but the cheeky birds just laugh at him. One day, when Guluu is at the river looking for worms, the butcher birds arrive and steal his food. He remembers the words of his Elders and he tries again – and this time Guluu has a different outcome.

Author: Greg Dreise

Pages: 32

Published: 3+

Little Birds Day

A simple, universal story of a day in the life of Little Bird as she sings the world alive

Sally Morgan’s beautiful words and Johnny Warrkatja Malibirr’s sensitive artwork combine to make this a beautiful, distinctive publication with global appeal. Johnny infuses his illustrations with his fine-art aesthetic, his traditional motifs and a quirky sense of humour.

Author: Sally Morgan, Johnny Warrkatja Malibirr (Illustrator)

Pages: 40

Published: 3+

Found

This gentle story set in the rugged Australian bush is about a small calf who becomes separated from his family.

The little calf is alone and simply wants his mother, sisters and brothers. He can see other animals, and after running to the river, manages to ask some horses if they are his family. The calf’s family have been taken away in the back of a noisy truck. So begins the little calf’s journey to find his family.

Author: Bruce Pascoe, Charmaine Ledden-Lewis (Illustrator)

Pages: 40

Published: 4+

Cunning Crow

Remember – beauty comes from within…

Way back, before once-upon-a-time, there was the Dreamtime when all the birds were white. One of those white birds was a crow called Waan. One day a big storm came through and a magnificent rainbow appeared. When the birds passed through the rainbow, one by one, their feathers took on its beautiful colours. Waan flew through the rainbow too and his feathers became a beautiful red and orange. But Waan was jealous of the other birds. He wanted to be more beautifully coloured than anyone. So Waan hatched a cunning plan.

Author: Gregg Dreise

Pages: 32

Published: 5+

Alfred’s War

Alfred’s War is a powerful story that unmasks the lack of recognition given to First Nations servicemen who returned from the WWI battlelines.

Alfred was a forgotten soldier. Although he had fought bravely in the Great War, as a First Nations man he wasn’t classed as a citizen of his own country. Yet Alfred always remembered his friends in the trenches and the mateship they had shared. Sometimes he could still hear the never-ending gunfire in his head and the whispers of diggers praying. Every year on ANZAC Day, Alfred walked to the nearest town, where he would quietly stand behind the people gathered and pay homage to his fallen mates.

Author: Rachel Bin Salleh, Samantha Fry

Pages: 40

Published: 4+

The White Girl

In The White Girl, Miles-Franklin-shortlisted author Tony Birch shines a spotlight on the 1960s and the devastating government policy of taking Indigenous children from their families.

Odette Brown has lived her whole life on the fringes of a small country town. After her daughter disappeared and left her with her granddaughter Sissy to raise on her own, Odette has managed to stay under the radar of the welfare authorities who are removing fair-skinned Aboriginal children from their families. When a new policeman arrives in town, determined to enforce the law, Odette must risk everything to save Sissy and protect everything she loves.

Author: Tony Birch

Pages: 272

Published: 2020

Welcome To Country (Second Edition)

Welcome to Country (2nd edition) is the essential follow-up to Australia’s landmark travel guide to Indigenous Australia by Marcia Langton.

Australia is home to the longest continuing culture on Earth, and Welcome to Country 2nd edition highlights myriad ways to engage and deepen our knowledge and appreciation of the First peoples through travel. Everything from arts centres to tours is covered in this guide, and there are also fascinating insights into Indigenous cultures and histories, as well as etiquette for visitors.

Author: Marcia Langton

Pages: 536

Published: 2021 (2nd Ed)

Treaty

The leading book on the treaty debate in Australia has been fully revised. This second edition takes a fresh look at modern treaty-making between First Nations People and governments in Australia.

A number of significant developments have occurred since the publication of the first edition. In Australia, key events include the emergence of State and Territory driven treaty processes, the negotiation and finalisation of the Noongar Settlement, and the delivery of the Uluru Statement from the Heart. International and comparative standards also continue to evolve.

Author: George Williams, Harry Hobbs

Pages: 384

Published: 2020 (2nd Ed)

Too Much Lip

Too much lip, her old problem from way back. And the older she got, the harder it seemed to get to swallow her opinions. The avalanche of bullshit in the world would drown her if she let it; the least she could do was raise her voice in anger.

Kerry plans to spend twenty-four hours, tops, over the border. She quickly discovers, though, that Bundjalung country has a funny way of grabbing on to people. Old family wounds open as the Salters fight to stop the development of their beloved river. And the unexpected arrival on the scene of a good-looking dugai fella intent on loving her up only adds more trouble – but then trouble is Kerry’s middle name. Gritty and darkly hilarious, Too Much Lip offers redemption and forgiveness where none seems possible.

Author: Melissa Lucashenko

Pages: 328

Published: 2020

The Yield

Knowing that he will soon die, Albert ‘Poppy’ Gondiwindi takes pen to paper. His life has been spent on the banks of the Murrumby River at Prosperous House, on Massacre Plains. Albert is determined to pass on the language of his people and everything that was ever remembered. He finds the words on the wind.

August Gondiwindi has been living on the other side of the world for ten years when she learns of her grandfather’s death. She returns home for his burial, wracked with grief and burdened with all she tried to leave behind. Her homecoming is bittersweet as she confronts the love of her kin and news that Prosperous is to be repossessed by a mining company. Determined to make amends she endeavours to save their land – a quest that leads her to the voice of her grandfather and into the past, the stories of her people, the secrets of the river.

Author: Tara June Winch

Pages: 352

Published: 2021

The Tracker

A collective memoir of one of Australia’s most charismatic First Nation’s leaders and an epic portrait of a period in the life of a country, reminiscent in its scale and intimacy of the work of Nobel Prize-winning Russian author Svetlana Alexievich.

A collective memoir of the charismatic First Nations leader, political thinker, and entrepreneur who died in Darwin in 2015. Taken from his family as a child and brought up in a mission on Croker Island, Tracker Tilmouth returned home to transform the world of First Nation’s politics. He worked tirelessly for First Nations self-determination, creating opportunities for land use and economic development in his many roles, including Director of the Central Land Council. He was a visionary and a projector of ideas, renowned for his irreverent humour and his anecdotes.

Author: Alexis Wright

Pages: 751

Published: 2017

The Sydney Wars

The Sydney Wars tells the history of military engagements between Europeans and First Nations Peoples – described as ‘this constant sort of war’ by one early colonist – around the greater Sydney region.

Analysing the paramilitary roles of settlers and convicts and the militia defensive systems that were deployed, it shows that white settlers lived in fear, while First Nations Peoples fought back as their land and resources were taken away. Stephen Gapps details the violent conflict that formed part of a long period of colonial strategic efforts to secure the Sydney basin and, in time, the rest of the continent.

Author: Stephen Gapps

Pages: 432

Published: 2018

The Little Red Yellow Black Book

Originally published in 1994, The Little Red Yellow Black Book has established itself as the perfect starting point for those who want to learn about the rich cultures and histories of Australia’s First Peoples.

In this fourth edition, readers will learn about some of the significant contributions that First Nations Peoples have made, and continue to make, to the Australian nation. Common stereotypes will be challenged, and the many struggles and triumphs that we’ve experienced as we’ve navigated through our shared histories will be revealed. Readers will also learn about some of the key concepts that underpin First Nations people worldviews including concepts such as the Dreaming, the significance of Ancestral Heroes and Country.

Author: AIATSIS (Bruce Pascoe)

Pages: 228

Published: 2018 (4th Ed)

The Dreaming and Other Essays

The pieces collected here span the career of W.E.H. Stanner as well as the history of Australian race relations. They reveal the extraordinary scholarship, humanity and vision of one of Australia’s finest essayists.

W.E.H. Stanner’s words changed Australia. Without condescension and without sentimentality, in essays such as ‘The Dreaming’ Stanner conveyed the richness and uniqueness of First Nations culture. In his Boyer Lectures he exposed a ‘cult of forgetfulness practised on a national scale,’ regarding the fate of First Nations People, for which he coined the phrase ‘the great Australian silence’.

Author: W.E.H Stanner

Pages: 304

Published: 2010 (1st Ed)