Close

Follow our
work

Nullam id dolor id nibh ultricies vehicula ut id elit. Cras justo odio, dapibus ac facilisis in, egestas eget quam. Donec ullamcorper nulla non metus auctor fringilla. Donec sed odio dui. Nulla vitae elit libero, a pharetra augue. Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. Donec ullamcorper nulla non metus auctor fringilla.

The Traditional Owners of this land are those who identify as
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples.

Sovereignty was never ceded.

ANTAR pays respect to Elders past, present, and emerging through our dedicated advocacy for First Nations Peoples’ justice and rights.

ANTAR acknowledges the responsibility of committing to a truth-telling process that promotes an honest and respectful path forward for future generations to build upon.

Enter website
Plants: Past, Present and Future

For millennia, reciprocal relationships with plants have provided both sustenance to Indigenous communities and many of the materials needed to produce a complex array of technologies. Managed through fire and selective harvesting and replanting, the longevity and intricacy of these partnerships are testament to the ingenuity and depth of Indigenous first knowledges. Plants: Past, Present and Future celebrates the deep cultural significance of plants and shows how engaging with this heritage could be the key to a healthier, more sustainable future.

The Girl from the Great Sandy Desert

The Girl from the Great Sandy Desert is the remarkable account of the life of Mana, a young Walmajarri girl and her family in the desert country of north-west Australia.

A collection of accessible stories that elucidate the rich cultural lives of pre-contact Aboriginal Australians, this book is a valuable resource for educators and young readers, and is accompanied by beautiful black and white illustrations.

Author: Jukuna Mona Chuguna, Pat Lowe, Mervyn Street (Illustrator

Pages: 98

Published: 6-12

Stories for Simon

A beautiful story of acknowledging the past and working together for a brighter future.

When Simon unwraps a beautiful boomerang wrapped in an old newspaper, he learns of the national apology to the Stolen Generations. Who were the Stolen Generations and how can saying ‘sorry’ help? Through a new friendship and a magnificent collection of stories, Simon gains a deep appreciation of the past and a positive vision for the future.

Author: Lisa Miranda Sarzin, Lauren Briggs (Illustrator)

Pages: 32

Published: 6-8

Spinifex Mouse

One morning, when Cheeky is far from home, he shows off his clever tricks in front of a hungry snake and becomes swept up in a heart-stopping and very risky adventure

Spinifex Mouse is the heartwarming tale of Cheeky, a spinifex hopping mouse, who lives in the Pilbara region of Western Australia. Cheeky is an adventurous little mouse who loves to leap high into the air and practice acrobatic tricks. Every morning, when his family have returned to their burrow to sleep after a night’s foraging, Cheeky sneaks out again to look for more food and practice his flips. Each day, he ventures a little further from the burrow.

Author: Norma MacDonald

Pages: 40

Published: 3-6

Sorry Day

In a time ‘long ago and not so long ago’ children were taken from their parents, their ‘sorrow echoing across the land’.

Two stories entwine in this captivating retelling of the momentous day when the then Prime Minister of Australia, Kevin Rudd, acknowledged the sorrows of past and said ‘Sorry’ to the generation of children who were taken from their homes.

Author: Coral Vass, Dub Leffler (Illustrator)

Pages: 34

Published: 5-10

Big Fella Rain

Big Fella Rain is a celebration of northern Australia as animals, birds, trees and a parched earth await the first rain.

Fern Martins illustrations seamlessly portray the dramatic skies, the thirsty animals and tiny creatures whose very existence rely on the monsoonal changes. Her exquisite rendering of the big landscape against the subtle shifts in the environment have a timeless quality that will capture the hearts of all readers.

Author: Beryl Webber, Fern Martins (Illustrator)

Pages: 32

Published: 3+

The White Girl

In The White Girl, Miles-Franklin-shortlisted author Tony Birch shines a spotlight on the 1960s and the devastating government policy of taking Indigenous children from their families.

Odette Brown has lived her whole life on the fringes of a small country town. After her daughter disappeared and left her with her granddaughter Sissy to raise on her own, Odette has managed to stay under the radar of the welfare authorities who are removing fair-skinned Aboriginal children from their families. When a new policeman arrives in town, determined to enforce the law, Odette must risk everything to save Sissy and protect everything she loves.

Author: Tony Birch

Pages: 272

Published: 2020

Two Sisters

Jukuna’s rich account may be the first autobiography written in an Aboriginal language. Presented in English and Walmajarri, her determination to see her language written has made her one of our most valued authors.

Ngarta and Jukuna lived in the Great Sandy Desert. They traversed country according to the seasons, just as the Walmajarri people had done for thousands of years. But it was a time of change. Desert people who had lived with little knowledge of European settlement were now moving onto cattle stations. Those left behind were vulnerable and faced unimaginable challenges.
In 1961, when Jukuna leaves with her new husband, young Ngarta remains with a group of women and children. Tragedy strikes and Ngarta is forced to travel alone. Her survival depends on cunning and courage as she is pursued by two murderers in a vast unforgiving landscape.

Author: Eirlys Richards Jukuna Mona Chuguna Ngarta Jinny Bent Pat Lowe

Pages: 128

Published: 2016

Truth-Telling: History, Sovereignty and the Uluru Statement

If we are to take seriously the need for telling the truth about our history, we must start at first principles.

What if the sovereignty of the First Nations was recognised by European international law in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries? What if the audacious British annexation of a whole continent was not seen as acceptable at the time and the colonial office in Britain understood that ‘peaceful settlement’ was a fiction? If the 1901 parliament did not have control of the whole continent, particularly the North, by what right could the new nation claim it? The historical record shows that the argument of the Uluru Statement from the Heart is stronger than many people imagine and the centuries-long legal position about British claims to the land far less imposing than it appears.

Author: Henry Reynolds

Pages: 288

Published: 2021

Treaty-Making 250 Years Later

This continent was colonised without consent. No treaty was signed at first contact or in the years thereafter. Australia is a nation state on shaky ground, one of few without a treaty with Indigenous people.

However, recently, Victoria, South Australia, the Northern Territory and Queensland have committed to entering treaty processes with the First Nations Peoples whose lands fall within their borders. This is the first time in Australian history that any government has opened a treaty process. While it is momentous, it is not without its challenges given the historical absence of a treaty. In this edited collection, First Nations and non-First Nations scholars and policy-makers from Australia and New Zealand engage with the legal, historical and political dimensions of treaty-making in Australia. These considered and nuanced contributions provide a roadmap for how to develop a legal artifice and treaty relationship that delivers justice.

Author: Alison Whittaker, Harry Hobbs, Lindon Coombes

Pages: 271

Published: 2021

Treaty and Statehood

If governments of Australia agreed to share power with Aboriginal people, what would the result be?

And if Australia was to have a settlement or a treaty with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, what would a treaty deal with and how would a treaty affect the general public? Is there anything beyond a treaty?Treaty and Statehood: Aboriginal Self-determination, by Aboriginal author Michael Mansell, answers these questions and more. Mansell examines the New Zealand model of designated Māori seats and applies the idea to comprise 12 Indigenous Senators in Australia. He argues designated seats and a treaty are constitutionally permissible, and details the possible content for a treaty. He discusses the meaning of self-determination and its limitations, and also thoroughly reviews Aboriginal sovereignty and its function in a modern Australia.

Author: Michael Mansell

Pages: 320

Published: 2016

Treaty

The leading book on the treaty debate in Australia has been fully revised. This second edition takes a fresh look at modern treaty-making between First Nations People and governments in Australia.

A number of significant developments have occurred since the publication of the first edition. In Australia, key events include the emergence of State and Territory driven treaty processes, the negotiation and finalisation of the Noongar Settlement, and the delivery of the Uluru Statement from the Heart. International and comparative standards also continue to evolve.

Author: George Williams, Harry Hobbs

Pages: 384

Published: 2020 (2nd Ed)

Title Fight

In the space of just fifteen years, Andrew ‘Twiggy’ Forrest’s Fortescue Metals Group has built a global iron-ore giant generating $19 billion in revenue a year.

Author: Paul Cleary

Pages: 288

Published: 2021

Too Much Lip

Too much lip, her old problem from way back. And the older she got, the harder it seemed to get to swallow her opinions. The avalanche of bullshit in the world would drown her if she let it; the least she could do was raise her voice in anger.

Kerry plans to spend twenty-four hours, tops, over the border. She quickly discovers, though, that Bundjalung country has a funny way of grabbing on to people. Old family wounds open as the Salters fight to stop the development of their beloved river. And the unexpected arrival on the scene of a good-looking dugai fella intent on loving her up only adds more trouble – but then trouble is Kerry’s middle name. Gritty and darkly hilarious, Too Much Lip offers redemption and forgiveness where none seems possible.

Author: Melissa Lucashenko

Pages: 328

Published: 2020

Tongerlongeter: First Nations Leader

This book does not remedy injustice, but it recognises it. It offers Tongerlongeter, his people and his allies respect, recognition and regret. May it be one of many such books.’ — Bill Gammage

During Tasmania’s Black War of 1823-31, Tongerlongeter led the most effective Aboriginal resistance campaign in Australian history. His Oyster Bay Nation of southeast Tasmania and his ally Montpelliatta’s Big River Nation of central Tasmania made some 710 attacks, killing 182 colonists and wounding a further 176. Despite this, First Nations casualties were up to three times greater and their population plummeted. Militarily it was a lost cause, yet their determined resistance and dogged commitment to Country, culture and each other provoked desperation at every level of the fledgling colony.

Author: Henry Reynolds, Nicholas Clements

Pages: 288

Published: 2021

The Yield

Knowing that he will soon die, Albert ‘Poppy’ Gondiwindi takes pen to paper. His life has been spent on the banks of the Murrumby River at Prosperous House, on Massacre Plains. Albert is determined to pass on the language of his people and everything that was ever remembered. He finds the words on the wind.

August Gondiwindi has been living on the other side of the world for ten years when she learns of her grandfather’s death. She returns home for his burial, wracked with grief and burdened with all she tried to leave behind. Her homecoming is bittersweet as she confronts the love of her kin and news that Prosperous is to be repossessed by a mining company. Determined to make amends she endeavours to save their land – a quest that leads her to the voice of her grandfather and into the past, the stories of her people, the secrets of the river.

Author: Tara June Winch

Pages: 352

Published: 2021